COUNTRY INN AND SUITES BOUNTIFUL - AND SUITES BOUNTIFUL


Country Inn And Suites Bountiful - Petit Palace Hotel Madrid - 7 Star Hotel In Dubia.



Country Inn And Suites Bountiful





country inn and suites bountiful






    country inn
  • A public house, informally known as a pub and sometimes referred to as the 'local', is an establishment licensed to serve alcoholic drinks for consumption on the premises in countries and regions of British influence. Britannica.com; Subscription Required. Retrieved 03-07-08.

  • Limited service. Guest rooms are decorated with an at-home feeling, and specialized decor may include antiques. May lack some modern amenities such as TVs or phones. Offers a dining room which reflects the ambience of the inn. At a minimum, breakfast and dinner are served. Parking may be limited.





    bountiful
  • Giving generously

  • big: given or giving freely; "was a big tipper"; "the bounteous goodness of God"; "bountiful compliments"; "a freehanded host"; "a handsome allowance"; "Saturday's child is loving and giving"; "a liberal backer of the arts"; "a munificent gift"; "her fond and openhanded grandfather"

  • producing in abundance; "the bountiful earth"; "a plentiful year"; "fruitful soil"

  • Large in quantity; abundant

  • (bountifulness) amplitude: the property of copious abundance





    suites
  • A set of furniture of the same design

  • (suite) apartment consisting of a series of connected rooms used as a living unit (as in a hotel)

  • A set of things belonging together, in particular

  • A set of rooms designated for one person's or family's use or for a particular purpose

  • (suite) a musical composition of several movements only loosely connected

  • (suite) cortege: the group following and attending to some important person











Bountiful Tabernacle




Bountiful Tabernacle





NRIS #76001813

Bountiful, Davis County, Utah

On February 11, 1851 (or 1857--there is some discrepancy among sources) Lorenzo Snow broke ground for the new building in a rather elaborate ceremony. The first stone was laid on February 12, 1857. The tabernacle was built almost entirely of local materials, with local labor. Cost was some $60,000. Architect was Augustus Farnham. Apparently the best materials and artisanship available were used, and at the time of erection it had the reputation for being the finest meetinghouse in the Territory of Utah.

Work on the tabernacle continued as Johnston's Army approached in 1857-58. When the town was evacuated in 1858, grain was stored in the rock foundation.

The building was finished in 1862, including the Joseph Smith mural which was commissioned by Brigham Young and painted by Daniel Waggelund. The dedication on March 14, 1863, was the occasion of a momentous gathering attended by several noteworthy dignitaries. Brigham Young presided and Heber C. Kimball offered the dedicatory prayer.

The five spires have been blown off the tower, at least once in 1906 by a Davis County east wind. They were restored some 50 years later.

In 1925 the north wing with amusement hall and classrooms was added. The building was "remodeled, redecorated and modernized" and a new pipe organ was added in 1942. In 1957 a new wing was added to the rear of the amusement hall, containing a kitchen, Relief Society room, and offices. The new part was dedicated on February 10, 1957, by President David O. McKay.

On March 14, 1963, a centennial service was held in and for the building. The featured speaker was President Hugh B. Brown, who rededicated the building "for another hundred years." He declared the tabernacle to be "holy ground" where every prophet but Joseph Smith had occupied the pulpit.
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The Bountiful Tabernacle is significant historically by virtue of its being the oldest religious structure in the State of Utah, the religious building enjoying the longest continuous use in Utah, and the oldest edifice built by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) to be in continuous use as a place of worship. Every prophet of the Mormons, save Joseph Smith, who was killed in Nauvoo, Illinois, before coming west, has preached in the tabernacle.

The Bountiful Tabernacle also has the distinction of being the oldest extant example, and undoubtedly the most impressive example from any period, of early Greek Revival architecture in Utah. Greek Revival styling was the first prominent style to take hold in Utah after the technology was developed to advance from the levels of primitive shelter and vernacular architecture. Architect Augustus A. Farnham, an early convert to the Mormon Church, was born in Andover, Massachusetts, ordinary adobe meetinghouse. Each craftsman in turn contributed his finest decorative work to set the tabernacle apart from other public buildings at the time. From the fine circular stairways leading to the gallery-- built by George W. Lincoln, to the classically pilastered and arched reredos framing the Weggelund portrait of Joseph Smith, the building was finished and detailed in the most refined methods the Bountiful pioneers were capable of. Recently saved from destruction by Mormon Church leaders, there is no other Utah structure that better represents the aspirations, pride, and accomplishments of pioneers in a primitive environment that the Bountiful Tabernacle. (Statement of Significance, National Register of Historic Places, 1975)











Bountiful Tabernacle




Bountiful Tabernacle





NRIS #76001813

Bountiful, Davis County, Utah

On February 11, 1851 (or 1857--there is some discrepancy among sources) Lorenzo Snow broke ground for the new building in a rather elaborate ceremony. The first stone was laid on February 12, 1857. The tabernacle was built almost entirely of local materials, with local labor. Cost was some $60,000. Architect was Augustus Farnham. Apparently the best materials and artisanship available were used, and at the time of erection it had the reputation for being the finest meetinghouse in the Territory of Utah.

Work on the tabernacle continued as Johnston's Army approached in 1857-58. When the town was evacuated in 1858, grain was stored in the rock foundation.

The building was finished in 1862, including the Joseph Smith mural which was commissioned by Brigham Young and painted by Daniel Waggelund. The dedication on March 14, 1863, was the occasion of a momentous gathering attended by several noteworthy dignitaries. Brigham Young presided and Heber C. Kimball offered the dedicatory prayer.

The five spires have been blown off the tower, at least once in 1906 by a Davis County east wind. They were restored some 50 years later.

In 1925 the north wing with amusement hall and classrooms was added. The building was "remodeled, redecorated and modernized" and a new pipe organ was added in 1942. In 1957 a new wing was added to the rear of the amusement hall, containing a kitchen, Relief Society room, and offices. The new part was dedicated on February 10, 1957, by President David O. McKay.

On March 14, 1963, a centennial service was held in and for the building. The featured speaker was President Hugh B. Brown, who rededicated the building "for another hundred years." He declared the tabernacle to be "holy ground" where every prophet but Joseph Smith had occupied the pulpit.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Bountiful Tabernacle is significant historically by virtue of its being the oldest religious structure in the State of Utah, the religious building enjoying the longest continuous use in Utah, and the oldest edifice built by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) to be in continuous use as a place of worship. Every prophet of the Mormons, save Joseph Smith, who was killed in Nauvoo, Illinois, before coming west, has preached in the tabernacle.

The Bountiful Tabernacle also has the distinction of being the oldest extant example, and undoubtedly the most impressive example from any period, of early Greek Revival architecture in Utah. Greek Revival styling was the first prominent style to take hold in Utah after the technology was developed to advance from the levels of primitive shelter and vernacular architecture. Architect Augustus A. Farnham, an early convert to the Mormon Church, was born in Andover, Massachusetts, ordinary adobe meetinghouse. Each craftsman in turn contributed his finest decorative work to set the tabernacle apart from other public buildings at the time. From the fine circular stairways leading to the gallery-- built by George W. Lincoln, to the classically pilastered and arched reredos framing the Weggelund portrait of Joseph Smith, the building was finished and detailed in the most refined methods the Bountiful pioneers were capable of. Recently saved from destruction by Mormon Church leaders, there is no other Utah structure that better represents the aspirations, pride, and accomplishments of pioneers in a primitive environment that the Bountiful Tabernacle. (Statement of Significance, National Register of Historic Places, 1975)









country inn and suites bountiful







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